Friday, February 02, 2007

My catalogue

I finally posted (some) of my books in LibraryThing. It's cooler than I thought, there are a couple of ways to organize and view your titles - like, I can visually browse my library, and so can you! And apparently somehow you can also make a photomosiac of your face made from the covers of all your books. Can't do that with my excel spreadsheet. I'm going to think about getting a life-time membership, which is only $25. With the free membership, you can only list a personal catalogue of 200 books, which is, conveniently, approximately how many fiction books I have. But that doesn't count all my Young Adult fiction, M.'s sci-fi, my plays, or our reference books or any of my art books. Well, here's my catalogue, if you want to have a look!

5 comments:

Kathy said...

I loved perusing your collection; lots of overlap with not only mine but also my husband's. There's one I'd like to ask you about called Out of Her Mind. The description sounds very compelling but when I read reviews elsewhere it sounded quite disappointing. What was your reaction to it?

Special K said...

Well, it's a collection of stories and essays, so, as with that kind of thing, some are great and some are kind of lame. But, it's an interesting collection of so-called "madness" attributed to women on accounta their "mysterious lady parts" (as Ricky Bobby would say), and, as such, does a good job of pointing out accurate causes for this "madness" throughout the ages. On of my favorite short stories, The Yellow Wallpaper, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, is included. If you like that, you might be interested in the rest.

Carrie said...

"The Yellow Wallpaper" is one of your favorites? I never knew that. I had to read that story in more than one literature class for my Eng. degree, and the story and characters alone never interested me much, but the historical context with feminist perspective makes it worth reading in one class, maybe not more than one.

Special K said...

Yeah, I got really into it when working on my thesis, because it's a perfect example of yellow, in the late 19th century, clearing standing as a symbol - in this case, "madness." But, of course, the story itself is so much more than that, and from a feminist point of view, it's fascinating.

Indiana Fan said...

You know I'm on Librarything, right?
I talked to you about the whole presentation thing on it that I did last summer for the Library?
Anyhoo. Cool to see you on there!